Marriage Statistics, Facts, and Trends in America [2022]

We’ve gathered all the studies and data on the current marriage statistics and trends in America to better understand how marriages work in this day and age.

For many of us, marriage can be one of the scariest and most exciting choices we make in our entire lives. Yet, commitment to a single person – in all of its forms – is an ancient and enduring human tradition.  

As society evolves, so do its oldest institutions; the following data can help us understand how marriage functions in the U.S. today. 

These stats illustrate some of the most interesting modern marriage trends:

  • With the exception of Maine, states in the Northeastern US all have marriage rates below the national average. 
  • Higher education can mean a shorter marriage. The median length of a marriage is 22 years for Americans with a high school diploma or less but decreases to 18 years for those with a master’s degree or higher. 
  • Before age 25, women are about 14 times more likely to get married than divorced. After age 45, women are more likely to get divorced than married. 
  • On average, homosexual men wait 8 years longer to get married than heterosexual men; homosexual women wait 4 years longer than heterosexual women. 
  • Men are more likely to remarry in Idaho than in any other state (46.6 men per 1,000 eligible get remarried each year). 
  • Women are more likely to remarry in Maine than in any other state (31.9 women per 1,000 eligible get remarried each year), but Idaho is a close second with a rate of 30.1.
  • Over three-quarters (76%) of couples in America live together before their first marriage. 

What Is the Marriage Rate in the United States?

Before you tie the knot, it’s natural to want to know just how many other people are doing it too. You might be surprised to learn that fewer people are getting married these days.

These numbers show the national marriage rates:

  • The average annual marriage rate in the US is 28.1 marriages per 1,000 women aged 15 or older. (Bowling Green State University, 2022)1
  • In 1920, there were about 12 marriages a year per 1,000 people in the US. By 2018, that number had fallen to 6.5 marriages per 1,000 unmarried people per year. (Our World in Data, 2020)2
  • In 2019, same-sex and heterosexual marriages differed in the percentage of couples getting their first marriage or re-marrying. (Bowling Green State University, 2019)3
    • Heterosexual marriages in 2019:
      • 63% were first marriages.
      • 37% were re-marriages.
    • Same-sex marriages in 2019:
      • Men:
        • 77% were first marriages.
        • 23% were re-marriages.
      • Women: 
        • 58% were first marriages.
        • 42% were re-marriages.
  • The marriage rate for women in 2020 (28.1 per 1,000) was a 50-year low, having steadily declined since the 1970s rate – 76.5 marriages per 1,000 unmarried women. (Bowling Green State University, 2022)1
  • The following numbers show the adjusted marriage rates for women from 2008 to 2020. The rate is per 1,000 – for example, “34.8” means that for every 1,000 unmarried women aged 15 or older, 34.8 of them were married that year.  (NCFMR, 2022)4
    • 2008 – 34.8 women per 1,000 unmarried women were married that year.
    • 2009 – 34.0 women per 1,000
    • 2010 – 31.9 women per 1,000
    • 2011 – 31.1 women per 1,000
    • 2012 – 31.5 women per 1,000
    • 2013 – 31.2 women per 1,000
    • 2014 – 31.9 women per 1,000
    • 2015 – 32.3 women per 1,000 
    • 2016 – 31.9 women per 1,000
    • 2017 – 32.2 women per 1,000
    • 2018 – 31.3 women per 1,000
    • 2019 – 30.5 women per 1,000
    • 2020 – 28.1 women per 1,000 
  • The following numbers show the adjusted marriage rates for men from 2008 to 2020. The rates are per 1,000 unmarried men over the age of 15. (NCFMR, 2022)4
    • 2008 – 40.5 men per 1,000 unmarried men were married that year. 
    • 2009 – 39.0 men per 1,000
    • 2010 – 36.0 men per 1,000
    • 2011 – 35.3 men per 1,000
    • 2012 – 35.8 men per 1,000
    • 2013 – 35.4 men per 1,000
    • 2014 – 35.9 men per 1,000
    • 2015 – 36.3 men per 1,000
    • 2016 – 35.6 men per 1,000
    • 2017 – 35.7 men per 1,000
    • 2018 – 34.7 men per 1,000
    • 2019 – 33.9 men per 1,000
    • 2020 – 30.7 men per 1,000

Why Is the Marriage Rate Declining?

We’ve all heard the stories about declining marriage rates and rising divorce rates, but what are the reasons behind these trends?

Research suggests that marriage isn’t what everyone wants. As women gain more agency in society and unplanned pregnancies decline, more people choose not to marry simply because they don’t have to.  

  • While women continue to gain better economic standing, the availability of “marriageable” men (men with money, stability, etc.) may be declining. (Journal of Marriage and Family, 2018)5
  • The risk of incarceration for men has increased while their economic standing has decreased overall. (Journal of Marriage and Family, 2018)5
  • Better contraceptives have reduced unplanned pregnancies and increased the number of sexually active singles, ultimately causing marriage rates to decline and the average age of marriage to increase. (National Bureau of Economic Research, 2019)6

Where Are the Highest Marriage Rates in the US?

Where do Americans get married the most? Anywhere but New England, according to the statistics. 

Here’s a breakdown of marriage rates by state:

  • All 50 US States and Washington D.C.’s adjusted marriage rates are ranked and sorted by quartile. Each number is per 1,000 unmarried women over the age of 15. (Bowling Green State University, 2022)1
    • 4th Quartile:
      • 1. Utah – 45.7 marriages
      • 2. Alaska – 45.2 marriages
      • 3. Idaho – 38.3 marriages
      • 4. Colorado – 35.7 marriages
      • 5. Arkansas – 35.6 marriages
      • 6. Oregon – 35.3 marriages
      • 7. Texas – 34.7 marriages
      • 8. Washington – 34.1 marriages
      • 9. Oklahoma – 33.2 marriages
      • 10. Tennessee – 33.0 marriages
      • 11. Indiana – 32.1 marriages
      • 12. Kansas – 31.8 marriages
      • 13. Kentucky – 31.7 marriages
    • 3rd Quartile:
      • 14. Georgia – 31.1 marriages
      • 15. Nebraska – 30.9 marriages 
      • 16. Wyoming – 30.6 marriages
      • 17/18. Alabama – 30.5 marriages
      • 17/18. Virginia – 30.5 marriages, tied with Alabama
      • 19. Nevada – 29.7 marriages
      • 20. North Carolina – 29.0 marriages
      • 21/22. South Carolina – 28.6 marriages
      • 21/22. Missouri – 28.6 marriages, tied with South Carolina
      • 23. South Dakota – 28.5 marriages
      • 24. Maine – 28.4 marriages
      • 25. North Dakota – 28.2 marriages
    • 2nd Quartile:
      • 26. Arizona – 28.1 marriages
      • 27. Hawaii – 28.0 marriages
      • 28. West Virginia – 27.7 marriages
      • 29. Florida – 27.3 marriages
      • 30. Iowa – 27.1 marriages
      • 31. California – 26.8 marriages
      • 32/33. Pennsylvania – 26.6 marriages
      • 32/33. Michigan – 26.6 marriages, tied with Pennsylvania
      • 34. New Mexico – 26.4 marriages
      • 35. Washington D.C. – 26.2 marriages
      • 36. Minnesota – 25.8 marriages
      • 37. Wisconsin – 25.6 marriages
      • 38. Illinois – 25.3 marriages
    • 1st Quartile
      • 39. New Hampshire – 25.0 marriages
      • 40. New Jersey – 24.9 marriages
      • 41. Ohio – 24.7 marriages
      • 42. Louisiana – 23.9 marriages
      • 43. Vermont – 23.0 marriages
      • 44. Massachusetts – 22.7 marriages
      • 45. Rhode Island – 22.3 marriages
      • 46. Maryland – 21.8 marriages
      • 47. New York – 21.4 marriages
      • 48. Mississippi – 20.4 marriages
      • 49. Connecticut – 20.2 marriages
      • 50. Delaware – 19.3 marriages
      • 51. Montana – 18.9 marriages
  • Aside from California, Arizona, Hawaii, New Mexico, and Montana, states in the Western Region of the US had marriage rates in the 3rd or 4th quartile in 2020. (Bowling Green State University, 2022)1
  • In 2020, Midwestern states mostly had marriage rates in the 2nd or 3rd quartiles. Ohio was the only exception, placing in the 1st quartile. (Bowling Green State University, 2022)1
  • Southern states in 2020 had marriage rates in each quartile, with the most representation being in the 3rd and 4th. (Bowling Green State University, 2022)1
  • Nearly all Northeast states had low 1st quartile marriage rates in 2020. Pennsylvania landed in the 2nd quartile, and only Maine reached the 3rd. (Bowling Green State University, 2022)1

When Do Most People Get Married (The First Time)?

There’s no need to jump the gun on marriage straight out of high school or college. In fact, the median age for a first marriage is just past the mid-twenties. 

Here’s the data: 

  • Men’s median age for their first marriage in 2008 was 28 years old, and women’s was 26.2 years old. (NCFMR, 2019)7
  • In 2017, the median age for men’s first marriage increased to 29.9 years old, and women’s rose to 28.1 years old. (NCFMR, 2019)7
  • The median age for first marriage in 2018 remained similar for men and women, at 29.8 years old and 27.8 years old, respectively. (NCFMR, 2019 [2])8
  • In 2019, same-sex first marriages among women happened at the median age of 31, while heterosexual marriages among women had a median age of 28. For men, the same-sex marriage median age was 35, and the heterosexual median age was 30. (NCFMR, 2021)9
  • The American median age for first marriage increased to 30.5 for men and 28.1 for women in 2020. (NCFMR, 2021 [2])10

How Age Relates to Marriage

While a median can be a useful statistic, these averages can paint a better picture of when most Americans marry for the first time. 

Take a look at these statistics:

  • Men and women, both same-sex and heterosexual, have unique trends in the average ages they marry or remarry: (Bowling Green State University, 2019)3
    • Women
      • First marriage:
        • Average 29 years old for heterosexual women.
        • Average 33 years old for homosexual women.
      • Remarriage:
        • Average 43 years old for heterosexual women. 
        • Average 43 years old for homosexual women. 
    • Men
      • First marriage:
        • Average 30 years old for heterosexual men.
        • Average 38 years old for homosexual men.
      • Remarriage:
        • Average 46 years old for heterosexual men.
        • Average 47 years old for homosexual men. 
  • In 2019, the average age difference for all heterosexual marriages was 3.9 years. For same-sex marriages, the average age difference was 6.3 years. (Bowling Green State University, 2019)3
  • For heterosexual first marriages, the average age difference was 2.9 years. In same-sex first marriages, the average age difference was 5.8 years. (Bowling Green State University, 2019)3
  • Remarriages tend to have greater age gaps, with heterosexual remarriages having an average age difference of 5.6 years and same-sex remarriages having an average age difference of 7.4 years. (Bowling Green State University, 2019)3

How Long Does the American Marriage Last?

“‘Til death do us part,” right? While many marriages last a lifetime, not all of them do. These numbers break down how long marriages typically last across various demographics.

  • The median duration of all marriages has stayed constant; it increased from 18 years to 19 years from 2009 to 2010 and has remained at 19 years ever since. (NCFMR, 2020)11
  • For first marriages, the shortest median marriage duration recorded was 11.1 years in 2009, likely caused in part by the Great Recession. By 2012, it had increased to 12.3 years. (NCFMR, 2014)12
  • The actual duration of U.S. marriages was broken down by percentage in a 2020 study: (NCFMR, 2020)11
    • 0-9 years married – 28% of marriages
    • 10-24 years married – 31%
    • 25-49 years married – 33%
    • 50-59 years married – 6%
    • 60+ years married – 2%
  • The length of marriages also varies by ethnicity. Here’s a breakdown of median marital duration by race/ethnicity: (NCFMR, 2020)11
    • Caucasian/white – 22 years
    • African-American/black – 15 years
    • Asian – 17 years
    • Hispanic – 15 years
    • Other ethnic groups – 13 years
  • Education level plays a role in the median length of marriages, and higher education typically correlates with shorter marriages: (NCFMR, 2020)11
    • Less than high school – 22 years
    • High school / GED – 22 years
    • Some college – 19 years
    • Bachelor’s Degree – 17 years
    • Master’s Degree or higher – 18 years
  • An individual’s number of marriages can also affect their median marital duration. Here are the numbers for the median duration of marriage by the number of times married: (NCFMR, 2020)11
    • Married once – 21 years
    • Married twice – 17 years
    • Married 3+ times – 13 years

Why Do People Get Married?

To some people, a life partner might sound crazy. To others, love trumps sanity any day of the week. 

Let’s take a look at why Americans get married:

  • Americans marry for all sorts of reasons, but here are the most prominent ones organized by the percentage of people who rank them as “very important.” (Pew Research, 2013)13
    • 88% – Love 
    • 81% – To make a lifelong commitment
    • 76% – For companionship 
    • 49% – Having Children
    • 30% – Having a relationship recognized in a religious ceremony
    • 28% – Financial security
    • 23% – For legal rights and benefits

Who’s Most Likely to Stay Married?

For better or for worse, certain demographics are more likely to stay married than to get divorced. 

These data points break down divorce rates by education, ethnicity, and age. 

  • In 2018, the highest marriage to divorce ratio by education was among women with bachelor’s degrees. The ratio was 2.8 – or nearly one divorce for about every three marriages. Here are the divorce ratios by education level: (Valerie Schweizer, NCFMR, 2019)14
    • Less than high school – 1.9 marriages per divorce.
    • High school / GED – 1.8 marriages per divorce.
    • Some college – 1.9 marriages per divorce.
    • Bachelor’s degree – 2.8 marriages per divorce.
    • Master’s degree – 2.6 marriages per divorce.
  • 15-24-year-old women had only one divorce for roughly every 14 marriages in 2018. Here are the complete numbers on women’s marriage to divorce ratios by age: (Valerie Schweizer, NCFMR, 2019)14
    • 15-24-year-olds – 14.1 marriages per divorce.
    • 25-34-year-olds – 4.5 marriages per divorce.
    • 35-44-year-olds – 1.3 marriages per divorce.
    • 45-54-year-olds – 0.9 marriages per divorce.
    • 55-64-year-olds – 0.7 marriages per divorce.
    • 65+-year-olds – 0.6 marriages per divorce.
  • Among women in 2018, the combined statistics of Asian-American, Native-American, Alaskan-Native, and multiracial women had the highest marriage to divorce rate at 3.0. Here’s a breakdown of the rates by ethnicity: (Valerie Schweizer, NCFMR, 2019)14
    • Other (Asian-American, Native-American, Alaskan-Native, and multiracial women) – 3.0 marriages per divorce.
    • Hispanic women – 2.5 marriages per divorce.
    • White/Caucasian women – 2.1 marriages per divorce.
    • African-American/Black women – 1.6 marriages per divorce.

What Is the Rate of Remarriage in the United States?

More and more divorcees are choosing not to remarry, but thousands of Americans still decide to give it another go. Men especially like to try for another marriage and remarry at nearly twice the rate women do. 

  • The rate of remarriage has been declining since 1990. In 2019, it was roughly 25.1 remarriages per 1,000 eligible people – a 25% decrease from the 2008 rate and a 50% decrease from the 1990 rate. (Leslie Reynolds, NCFMR, 2021)15 
  • Men are more likely to remarry than women, with their average remarriage rate being 35.1 and women’s being 19.4. (Leslie Reynolds, NCFMR, 2021)15
  • In 2019, the median age at which men typically remarried was 48, while the median remarrying age for women was 44. (Leslie Reynolds, NCFMR, 2021)15

Which States Have the Highest and Lowest Remarriage Rates?

If you’re looking to remarry, check out this breakdown of remarriage rates by state.  You’ll have the best chances in Idaho and the worst in New England.  

  • These are the rates of remarriage in the five highest and five lowest states: (Leslie Reynolds, NCFMR, 2021)15
    • Remarriages per 1,000 women eligible to remarry, ranked lowest to highest:
      • States with the five lowest rates:
        • Delaware – 8.8
        • Hawaii – 11.1
        • Massachusetts – 12.2
        • New Jersey – 12.4
        • Rhode Island – 12.8
      • States with the five highest rates:
        • Nebraska – 26.7
        • Mississippi – 27.1
        • Utah – 29.4 
        • Idaho – 30.1 
        • Maine – 31.9
    • Remarriages per 1,000 men eligible to remarry, ranked lowest to highest:
      • States with the five lowest rates:
        • Rhode Island – 13.2
        • North Dakota – 15.7
        • Vermont – 16.2 
        • Delaware – 17.9
        • South Dakota – 20.6
      • States with the five highest rates:
        • Washington D.C. – 45.2
        • Wyoming – 45.3
        • Mississippi – 45.6
        • Oklahoma – 46.2 
        • Idaho – 46.6
  • Most states with the highest remarriage rates for both men and women are in the Midwest. (Leslie Reynolds, NCFMR, 2021)15
  • The lowest rates of remarriage for women are in the Northeastern U.S. (Leslie Reynolds, NCFMR, 2021)15
  • The lowest rates of remarriage for men are also located in the Northeastern U.S. (Leslie Reynolds, NCFMR, 2021)15

Premarital Cohabitation and Parenting

While it used to be taboo, more and more couples are realizing how important it is to live with their partner before marriage. 

  • These numbers break down the percentages of first marriages, by year, cohabiting before marriage. (Wendy Manning, NCFMR, 2021)16
    • 1964-1974 – 11% of marriages.
    • 1975-1979 – 32% of marriages.
    • 1980-1984 – 41% of marriages.
    • 1985-1989 – 46% of marriages.
    • 1990-1994 – 56% of marriages. 
    • 1995-1999 – 59% of marriages. 
    • 2000-2004 – 68% of marriages. 
    • 2005-2009 – 68% of marriages. 
    • 2010-2014 – 72% of marriages.
    • 2015-2019 – 76% of marriages.
  • The median ages at which people get married are broken down by cohabitation status and year: (Wendy Manning, NCFMR, 2021)16
    • 2005-2009:
      • No cohabitation – median age of 23
      • Cohabitation – median age of 26
    • 2010-2014:
      • No cohabitation – median age of 23
      • Cohabitation – median age of 26
    • 2015-2019:
      • No cohabitation – median age of 25
      • Cohabitation – median age of 27
  • About three-quarters (76%) of marriages were preceded by cohabitation from 2015 to 2019 (Wendy Manning, NCFMR, 2021)16
  • 7% of American children (roughly 5 million) were living with unmarried cohabiting parents in 2013. (Payne, NCFMR, 2021)
  • 9% of children lived in a stepfamily in 2019. Of these, almost half (44%) lived with unmarried cohabiting parents. (Payne, NCFMR, 2021)

How High Is the U.S. Divorce Rate?

If you’re thinking about popping the question, the divorce rate can be a scary thought. Take some comfort in knowing that it’s actually going down – albeit slowly. 

  • The U.S. divorce rate is slightly declining. There were 14.9 divorces annually per 1,000 married women in 1970, which dropped to an even 14.0 in 2020. (Scholar Works, 2022)17
  • Nearly one million women (960,014) got divorced in 2020. (Scholar Works, 2022)17
  • Here are the adjusted divorce rates for women from 2008 to 2020. Rates are the number of divorces per 1,000 married women over the age of 15 per year. (Payne, NCFMR, 2022)18
    • 2008 – 20.5
    • 2009 – 19.1
    • 2010 – 19.4
    • 2011 – 19.4
    • 2012 – 19.6
    • 2013 – 18.5
    • 2014 – 17.6
    • 2015 – 16.9 
    • 2016 – 16.7
    • 2017 – 16.1
    • 2018 – 15.7
    • 2019 – 15.5
    • 2020 – 14.0
  • Here are the adjusted divorce rates for men from 2008 to 2020. Rates are the number of divorces per 1,000 married men over the age of 15 per year. (Payne, NCFMR, 2022)18
    • 2008 – 18.2
    • 2009 – 17.0
    • 2010 – 17.2
    • 2011 – 17.7
    • 2012 – 17.6
    • 2013 – 16.5 
    • 2014 – 15.6 
    • 2015 – 15.3
    • 2016 – 15.1
    • 2017 – 14.6
    • 2018 – 14.1 
    • 2019 – 13.9
    • 2020 – 12.6

Data on Single Parents

  • 22% of children were living with a single parent in 2019, making it the second-most common family type. (Payne, NCFMR, 2019)19
  • In 2019, 86% of children in single-parent households were living with a single mother, and just 14% were living with a single father. This number has hardly changed since 2013, when 87% of single-parent households had a single mother. (Payne, NCFMR, 2019)17
  • Here are the numbers of children living in single-parent homes broken down by single mother vs. single father: (Statista, 2021)20
    • 1970
      • Single mother – 7,452,000 children
      • Single father – 748,000 children
    • 1975 
      • Single mother – 10,231,000 children
      • Single father – 1,014,000 children
    • 1980
      • Single mother – 11,406,000 children
      • Single father – 1,060,000 children
    • 1985
      • Single mother – 13,081,000 children
      • Single father – 1,554,000 children
    • 1990
      • Single mother – 13,874,000 children
      • Single father – 1,993,000 children
    • 1995
      • Single mother – 16,477,000 children
      • Single father – 2,461,000 children
    • 2000
      • Single mother – 16,162,000 children
      • Single father – 3,058,000 children
    • 2005
      • Single mother – 17,225,000 children
      • Single father – 3,497,000 children
    • 2010 
      • Single mother – 17,283,000 children
      • Single father – 2,572,000 children
    • 2012
      • Single mother – 17,991,000 children 
      • Single father – 2,924,000 children
    • 2013
      • Single mother – 17,532,000 children
      • Single father – 2,999,000 children
    • 2014
      • Single mother – 17,410,000 children
      • Single father – 2,848,000 children
    • 2015
      • Single mother – 17,006,000 children
      • Single father – 2,751,000 children
    • 2016 
      • Single mother – 17,223,000 children
      • Single father – 3,006,000 children
    • 2017
      • Single mother – 16,767,000 children 
      • Single father – 3,206,000 children
    • 2018
      • Single mother –  16,395,000 children
      • Single father – 3,251,000 children
    • 2019
      • Single mother –  15,764,000 children
      • Single father –  3,234,000 children
    • 2020
      • Single mother – 15,310,000 children
      • Single father – 3,270,000 children

Conclusion

Marriage is one of the biggest decisions in a person’s life, but we now have more data and choices than ever before. Most Americans can experience living together before getting married. And while the marriage rate is declining, so is the divorce rate.

There are more socially-acceptable ways to be together today than at any point in history. Single-parent families are common, cohabiting parents are common, and even divorce is common. So if you’re thinking about marriage now, you’re making a more informed decision about love than any of your ancestors possibly could have. 

And if it turns out to be a mistake, that’s okay too. Millions of Americans experience love both within marriage and outside it, and the institution changes with every generation.


Footnotes

  1. Bowling Green State University, 2022. A study on the marriage rate in the U.S. utilizing a compilation of surveys for data on over 3.5 million American households.
  2. Our World in Data, 2020. A comprehensive report on marriage trends across the world authored by Esteban Ortiz-Ospina and Max Roser that uses data from several sources, including Pew Research and United Nations World Marriage Data.
  3. Bowling Green State University, 2019. A comparative report on marriage trends between heterosexual and same-sex couples authored by Krista K. Payne and Wendy D. Manning.
  4. National Center for Family & Marriage Research (NCFMR), 2022. A comprehensive chart showing marriage trends for both men and women from 2008 to 2020 and utilizing data from the US Census Bureau.
  5. Journal of Marriage and Family, 2018. A research article on the declining marriage rate in the United States that studies 60,000 American households to determine the primary causes.
  6. National Bureau of Economic Research, 2019. A research paper that analyzes a variety of studies to determine causes of the declining marriage rate.
  7. National Center for Family & Marriage Research (NCFMR), 2019. An infographic report compiled by Krista K. Payne that analyzes marriage trends using data from the US Census Bureau.
  8. National Center for Family & Marriage Research (NCFMR) [2], 2019. An infographic report compiled by Krista K. Payne that utilizes data from the US Census Bureau and other sources to determine the median age of initial marriage in men and women.
  9. National Center for Family & Marriage Research (NCFMR), 2021. An infographic report compiled by Krista K. Payne and Wendy D. Manning that utilizes census data to determine the median age of initial marriage in both heterosexual and same-sex couples in 2019.
  10. National Center for Family & Marriage Research (NCFMR) [2], 2021. An infographic report by Krista K. Payne that utilizes census data to analyze trends in the median age of first marriage for Americans.
  11. National Center for Family & Marriage Research (NCFMR), 2020. A report compiled by Krista K Payne that utilizes census data and other sources to determine the median duration of American marriages.
  12. National Center for Family & Marriage Research (NCFMR), 2014. A report compiled by Krista K. Payne that utilizes census data to analyze the fluctuating duration of marriages in America during the Great Recession.
  13. Pew Research, 2013. A study of 1,197 Americans to analyze common marriage trends across different demographics and determine the reasons that people choose to get married.
  14. Valerie Schweizer, NCFMR, 2019. A report authored by Valeria Schweizer that uses the American Community Survey to determine the ratio of marriage to divorce in the United States.
  15. Leslie Reynolds, NCFMR, 2021. A report authored by Leslie Reynolds that uses data from the U.S. Census Bureau and American Community Survey to determine trends in remarriage in the United States.
  16. Wendy Manning, NCFMR, 2021. A report authored by Wendy D. Manning and Lisa Carlson that uses a variety of sources to determine trends in premarital cohabitation in the U.S.
  17. Scholar Works, 2022. A report on the U.S. divorce rate by geographic variation authored by Krista K. Westrick-Payne and utilizing data from the U.S. Census Bureau.
  18. Payne, NCFMR, 2022. A report on marriage and divorce in the U.S. authored by Krista Westrick-Payne and citing data from the U.S. Census Bureau.
  19. Payne, NCFMR, 2019. An infographic report of the family structures that American children live in, authored by Krista K. Payne and utilizing data from the U.S. Census Bureau.
  20. Statista, 2021. A report on the number of children living in single-parent homes in the United States from 1970 to 2020 published by Statista.
Dainis Graveris

Dainis Graveris

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